TNT Radio: Dr Michelle Perro on What’s Making Our Children Sick?

RHI Advisor, Dr. Michelle Perro, in conversation with John O’Sullivan and TNT radio.  States Perro:

Although foods derived from GE crops have gone from non-existent in 1994 to ubiquitous in nearly 3 decades, not a single study has compared humans who eat them to those who don’t. It is clearly in the public interest to enable science-based decisions about foods and food-like ingredients derived from GE crops and animals in our diets. Research on the untoward effects of GE crops on human and animal health, as well as their effects on the environment, should be undertaken.

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW ON PRINCIPIA SCIENTIFIC INTERNATIONAL

7 ways to instill healthier eating habits in your kids—and why it matters

(originally published on DrHoffman.com)

Poor childhood nutrition is one of the most critical problems that threatens the health, productivity, and even national security of America.

Time was, during the mobilization of young men that accompanied World Wars I and II, a high percentage of recruits were underweight and undernourished; they had to be fattened up on military fare to meet the basic physical requirements of combat-readiness.

Now, the armed forces face the opposite problem: too many volunteers are overweight and can’t pass increasingly lenient tests of endurance and stamina. The term “hunger” has been supplanted by “food insecurity”, which means that too many impoverished American families aren’t starving, but don’t have consistent access to good quality food.

The result: “Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report in the New England Journal of Medicine (Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012). Type 2 diabetes increased at the rate of 7% annually, and the rate was especially high among non-white Hispanics, Blacks and Native Americans.

Nor is the problem restricted to less affluent or minority precincts. Junk food consumption abounds across all demographics. Even if it doesn’t produce overweight, it sets the stage for a myriad of inflammatory, allergic, and cardiovascular diseases, even childhood cancers. And it may impair the cognitive development of kids, resulting in an unprecedented rise in behavioral and developmental conditions like autism, ADHD, bipolar disorder, and childhood depression and anxiety. One study reveals that higher fruit and vegetable intake is linked to better mental health in secondary schoolchildren.

While some surveys suggest that Americans’ embrace of junk food peaked in the early 2000s and is now declining, a review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds the opposite. While, indeed, there were significant decreases in particular junk food categories (e.g. candy, cakes, and pies), they were offset by increases in other categories, especially snack and meal bars. This parallels a trend toward supplanting sugary soda with “energy drinks”, juice beverages, and diet soda.

Cereal bars and nutrition bars marketed as replacements for real food are endowed with a false “health halo” when labeled as “natural”, “organic”, “keto” or “high-protein”. I eat bars maybe 2 or 3 times a year when I need muscle glycogen for an endurance event like a triathlon. They are ill-suited to “tiding you over” when you’re too busy to sit down to eat real food.

CONTINUE READING ON DRHOFFMAN.COM

Well Being: Organic Food

(originally published on ‘Who is Robert Malone’)

I used to be somewhat skeptical on the importance of eating organic foods. Then in 2018, an important paper in JAMA came out. That study showed that eating a higher proportion of organic food is inversely associated with the overall risk of cancer (P for trend = .001). Inversely associated in this case means that the more organic foods in the diet, the less cancer.

Since then, numerous other peer reviewed papers have been published documenting the benefits of eating organic food. Recently, some important studies have been done that show very strong correlations between pesticide and herbicide use and various diseases. There are many reasons to eat organic, but reducing the residues of Roundup (glyphosate) and other chemicals on foods is a big one.

Today, I am going to list the issues with commercially grown food and then simply present some of the peer reviewed papers that show the importance of eating organic foods. Some of these articles are scientifically complex. However, the bulleted points should be clear enough -for those that don’t feel like diving into the science.

If one can’t afford to eat organically, the other big message is to read food labels for “country of origin.” These days, that can be difficult to determine – due to the issuance of the USDA “Cool rules.” Under these guidelines, processed foods do not need to require a country of origin labelling, if they are assembled or combined in the USA. But even still, read those food labels – they matter!

CONTINUE READING ON ‘WHO IS ROBERT MALONE’

Project Highlight: Northeast Grass-Fed Beef Initiative

The Northeast Grass-Fed Beef Initiative partners with farmers to support transitions to regenerative, cattle-based systems that help restore ecosystem health and revitalize rural economies.

Regenerative Methods

Regenerative grazing and pasture management practices can revitalize Northeast landscapes and communities.

Our evidence-based approach combines multi-paddock rotational grazing methods with whole farm strategic planning, empowering farmers to build opportunity and stability.

Profitable Farms

Farms that adopt these science-based practices save money on feed, fertilizers, and other off-farm inputs, as well as animal healthcare.

Grass-fed products also sell at a premium, bringing more revenue back to the farm.

Healthy Ecosystems

Regenerative grazing builds soil health and fertility, sequesters carbon, and reduces or eliminates the need for chemical fertilizers and biocides.

These benefits directly combat climate change and water pollution, and protect against droughts and floods.

Resilient Communities

The financial benefits of regenerative grazing provide fair compensation for labor, support viable farm businesses, and build diversified farm income.

Here in the Northeast, we have everything we need to produce grass-fed beef– not only for our rural neighbors, but to supply our own urban areas. We can make our entire region more resilient in times of crises such as pandemics and extreme weather events.

 

Regenerating Our Health and Food

Originally published in Masters of Health Magazine

Since the writing of the book, ‘What’s Making our Children Sick’, discussing the effects of industrial food-like products on our children’s health, planetary health has taken many unfortunate turns and looks very different from even just a few years ago since its publication. Despite nearly two years of health-based fear and anxiety emanating from individuals enduring two years of a global pandemic, there have been revelations regarding major gaps in the weave of the fabric of our healthcare system. However, these gaps and shortcomings can be the impetus and creation of a redirection towards a welcomed, positive change in both our healthcare model and practice.

The gold ring at the pinnacle of medical practice is evidence-based medicine, which is the judicious use of modern, best practice in coming to decisions about strategies in helping clients. The goal is the integration of clinical experience in conjunction with patient directives based on excellence in science.

What has become clear is that there are links between evidence-based medicine, the health of individuals, and of our ecosystem. Taken directly from our book, we called for the creation not only of Ecosystem Health,but a new direction in the formation of a broader and integrative practice: Ecomedicine.

Patients are part of a medico-environmental ecosystem, considering food-related causes of ill health and achieving health of the food ecosystem simultaneously with its constituents. What is clear is that healthy soil, plants and people are all part of the same ecosystem.

How we grow our food is how we grow our health.

The running narrative that has predominated during the present global health crisis, supported by governments, pharmaceutical companies, and mainstream media, is focused on a very narrow view of what ultimately defines and supports health. Holistic approaches toward preventive medicine, immune support, and treatments for infections have been actively bullied, targeted, and tossed aside in favor of pharma-based interventions. Additionally, integrative practitioners have been censored and actively removed from journals and social media platforms, creating an enormous schism away from available holistic therapeutic options for patients in favor of pharmaceuticals. One might say that there has been a conspiracy of factors in this situation.

This has led to monopolies on knowledge production which leave holistically-minded practitioners to fend for themselves in trying to find solutions that are not tied to industry.

This is further complicated by the fact that what has occurred in the laboratories of agricultural science seldom makes its way to the clinic, let alone translated into treatment programs for patients. The question of the role of unsafe agrochemical-produced foods that has impacted the present pandemic is simply not part of the clinical practice repertoire.

For example, upon review of the literature to date, there has been very little published in the scientific writings or by public health agencies regarding non-drug based strategies in regard to COVID-19. A guide published by the World Health Organization (WHO) addressing the concept of food as medicine, healthy dietary guidelines from some countries outside the US (India), and one newspaper article featuring a surgeon in Florida promoting nutraceuticals for COVID-19, were some of the few meager offerings by traditional sources.

However, despite a plethora of science and research on the topic, it has been even more unusual to encounter a discussion regarding the links between GM0s/pesticide-laden foods and today’s poor health.

CONTINUE READING IN MASTERS OF HEALTH MAGAZINE

Regenerating Our Health and Food

RHI advisors, Andre Leu, Stephanie Seneff and Michelle Perro are featured in the August 2022 Masters of Health on-line magazine, discussing the regenerative agriculture/health revolution.

Regenerative agriculture and animal husbandry is the next and higher stage of organic food and farming, not only free from toxic pesticides, GMOs, chemical fertilizers, and factory farm production, and therefore good for human health, but also reiterative in terms of the health of the soil.

Ronnie Cummins
Organic Consumers Association

CLICK HERE TO READ THE LATEST ISSUE OF MASTERS OF HEALTH

 

What’s Making our Children Sick?

Regenerating Our Health and Food

So many ill children reveal the ways we have outgrown our medical model and our predominant food production systems.  The problems our kids suffer from most persistently today are complex, arising from a multisystem dysfunctional biological catastrophe, particularly in relation to immunity, autoimmunity, and the health sequelae that arise from these problems.  These diseases suggest a body that is both confused and collapsing under the pressure of so many toxic exposures.  If we are looking for evidence that our food systems have failed us, we should pay attention to these children.  We have a generation of children whose chronic illnesses do not resemble those of the previous generations.  Our kids are sicker than their parents, and arguably sicker than their parents were when they were children, regardless of our agricultural and pharmaceutical “advances.”  Clinical evidence indicates that we are doing something wrong. Quite possibly what we are doing wrong today started with the changes to our food production that began just before most of these kids were born.  The vital question is: How do we get out of this mess?

Perro and Adams,
What’s Making our Children Sick?
Chapter 17

Since the writing of the book, What’s Making our Children Sick?, discussing the effects of industrial food-like products on our children’s health, planetary health has taken many unfortunate turns and looks very different from even just a few years ago since its publication.  Despite nearly two years of health-based fear and anxiety emanating from individuals enduring two years of a global pandemic, there have been revelations regarding major gaps in the weave of the fabric of our healthcare system.  However, these gaps and shortcomings can be the impetus and creation of a redirection towards a welcomed, positive change in both our healthcare model and practice.

The gold ring at the pinnacle of medical practice is evidence-based medicine, which is the judicious use of modern, best practice in coming to decisions about strategies in helping clients.  The goal is the integration of clinical experience in conjunction with patient directives based on excellence in science.  What has become clear is that there are links between evidence-based medicine, the health of individuals, and of our ecosystem. Taken directly from our book, we called for the creation not only of Ecosystem Health, but a new direction in the formation of a broader and integrative practice: Ecomedicine. Patients are part of a medico-environmental ecosystem, considering food-related causes of ill health and achieving health of the food ecosystem simultaneously with its constituents.  What is clear is that healthy soil, plants and people are all part of the same ecosystem.

How we grow our food is how we grow our health. 

The running narrative that has predominated during the present global health crisis, supported by governments, pharmaceutical companies, and mainstream media, is focused on a very narrow view of what ultimately defines and supports health.  Holistic approaches toward preventive medicine, immune support, and treatments for infections have been actively bullied, targeted, and tossed aside in favor of pharma-based interventions.  Additionally, integrative practitioners have been censored and actively removed from journals and social media platforms, creating an enormous schism away from available holistic therapeutic options for patients in favor of pharmaceuticals.  One might say that there has been a conspiracy of factors in this situation.  This has led to monopolies on knowledge production which leave holistically-minded practitioners to fend for themselves in trying to find solutions that are not tied to industry.

This is further complicated by the fact that what has occurred in the laboratories of agricultural science seldom makes its way to the clinic, let alone translated into treatment programs for patients.  The question of the role of unsafe agrochemical-produced foods that has impacted the present pandemic is simply not part of the clinical practice repertoire.  For example, upon review of the literature to date, there has been very little published in the scientific writings or by public health agencies regarding non-drug based strategies in regard to COVID-19.  A guide published by the World Health Organization (WHO) addressing the concept of food as medicine, healthy dietary guidelines from some countries outside the US (India), and one newspaper article featuring a surgeon in Florida promoting nutraceuticals for COVID-19, were some of the few meager offerings by traditional sources.

However, despite a plethora of science and research on the topic, it has been even more unusual to encounter a discussion regarding the links between GMOs/pesticide-laden foods and today’s poor health. We can do better. 

The way forward is to move beyond Pill for Ill medicine and reorient our health system to a food-focused medical model.  As our foods have become engineered and by-products of laboratories and the technocracy, patients and practitioners alike have been engineered and manipulated to believe that food is not important to health.  Rather than making a bee-line to the prescription pad when confronted with illness, a redirect to the local farmer’s market should be in order.  While there is no need to throw the baby out with the bath water, reliance on pharmaceuticals can be shifted towards a reliance on our pantries and ovens.  In order to offer the type of care that advances the proposition that food is the key integral factor to health, practitioners will have to think beyond the pill.  This type of ecomedicine model is the foundation of a new chapter, Regeneration Health International (RHI).  In this model, health can be sought and achieved only if the food ecosystem in itself is healthy.

The sequelae of the healthy food system is the regeneration of soil with the additional benefits of soil restoration, which is offsetting environmental degradation.  Our ultimate health is inexorably linked to the health of our soil.  The future of our health is tied to regenerative agriculture.

From the dark throes of the pandemic, the holistic health movement has galvanized in the birth and creation of a new, enlightened international campaign, RHI.  This platform will focus on the reorientation and education of the public regarding what real health looks like.  The main thrust of this new chapter is to recreate health as a positive experience and move away from monopolized, profit-driven narratives.  RHI will maintain its position as a center of excellence, a source of consumer-friendly unbiased resources and educational materials, networking and outreach in the arena of holistic/integrative health.

Along with our allies in the organic food movement and health freedom arena, RHI will team up with leaders in the regenerative food movement such as the Organic Consumers Association and Regeneration International.  A true testimonial to our success will be when the provision of healthy, nutritious and non-toxic food is the centerpiece for public health campaigns.  Rather than coerce our present model towards this health paradigm switch, we are calling for the generation of a new model, incorporating many of the tools already found in the holistic health toolbox.

Stay tuned for more information as we unite in the launch of this new coalition in 2022.

GMO Myths & Facts: A Summary

For the past several decades, the public has been fed the rhetoric that genetically modified (GM) crops and foods are needed to feed the world’s growing population and to meet the challenges that farmers face, including climate change as well as pests and diseases. However, scientific research and real-world farming experience show that GM crops and foods have not delivered on their promises of increased yields or reduced toxic chemical inputs.

Instead, GM crops have presented farmers with new challenges of controlling herbicide-resistant superweeds and Bt-resistant superpests. In addition, GM crops have not been shown to be safe to eat, and existing research shows that some GM crops – and the pesticides that go hand in hand with them – pose worrying health risks.

These are the conclusions made in GMO Myths and Facts: What they dont want to tell you about genetically modified crops and foods, a meticulously referenced, reader-friendly, 28-page booklet written by Claire Robinson, editor of GMWatch.org, and produced by the Sheepdrove Trust to educate and inform the public.

CONTINUE READING ON GMO SCIENCE

Microbiome Health for Kids: The Effects of Pesticides in the Diet

The microbiome is finally being recognized and valued for its crucial role in creating and maintaining a robust immune system. We’ve all been inundated with information on how to best boost our immunity, so that if/when we become part of the population that contracts COVID-19 (30-70%), we are empowered to also be part of the population (80%) that sails through the infection unscathed. A strong and balanced immune system is vital, not only for protection from COVID-19, but also against assaults from a variety of other bad actors, like autoimmune disorders and cancer. With Covid-19, kids (94% of those infected) seem to be managing well, and their microbiota plays a big part in keeping their immune systems strong. So how can parents best support their kids’ microbiomes to ensure they have the strong immune systems needed to fight infections? 

FOOD is the best medicine! Our diets should nourish our bodies and the microbes that work so diligently on our behalf. Our microbes enjoy organic, whole foods free of chemicals, rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, and filled with fiber (their favorite food)! 

Food should be free of chemical additives. Our food supply (unless organic) is doused with pesticides and glyphosate-based herbicides (such as Roundup®). In a study performed by the Environmental Working Group, glyphosate was found in most oat-based cereals—food kids commonly eat. More than 250 million pounds of glyphosate is applied to our food crops each year. It is used on “Roundup®-ready” crops, which are designed to tolerate herbicides, as well as being used as a desiccant on off-label crops, such as oats, wheat and legumes. 

So, how does glyphosate in our kids’ diet affect their microbiome? 

Well, glyphosate is an antibiotic, and we know that antibiotics kill good bacteria along with the bad. Additionally, scientific literature has shown that glyphosate negatively affects our microbes via the shikimate pathway—a series of reactions found in plants and bacteria that create various proteins from aromatic amino acids. These proteins are necessary in synthesizing neurotransmitters, the chemicals that help run our neurologic systems. If their production is inadequate or imbalanced, neurocognitive dysfunction can result. Think about the epidemic of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (1 in 54 kids) and ADHD (10% of kids). Could this ubiquitous herbicide that has now permeated the global landscape be partly responsible for negatively altering our children’s microbiota and healthy neurological functioning? 

The gut communicates with the brain via the enteric nervous system and by way of the vagus nerve. Microbes create neurotransmitters (such as dopamine and serotonin), but also other communicators (peptides and inflammatory chemicals) which directly affect brain function. ‘Inflammatory’ monocytes (cells produced by the innate immune system) are proposed to be the link between the antibiotic effect on the gut microbes by pesticides and changes reported in the brain, such as activation of the brain’s immune system (microglial cells). The microglial cell activation represents brain inflammation, which can be manifested as the neurocognitive disorders being reported in children. 

So what can parents do? The first steps in sustaining our kids’ beautiful biota are prevention and avoidance! Eliminating exposure to pesticides is key to supporting microbial abundance and diversity. Eating an organic, plant-based diet with plenty of fermented foods is the cornerstone of dietary health. But, since kids can be such picky eaters, using a spore-based probiotic like MegaSporeBiotic™, can help supplement their diet and support a healthy immune system.